Memorial for Bill Kenwright from The RYTC

The RYTC team was deeply saddened to learn of the passing of our friend and patron Bill Kenwright CBE. 

Bill was a partner, father, grandfather, great friend and patron. He will be missed by many and this is testament to his giving nature and impact on the theatre and creative arts space. The team wanted to honour his legacy and influence with this memorial page.

The RYTC’s Artistic Director started her career in Bill Kenwright’s work family. Bill told her to go and open her own youth theatre, because ‘being creative is so important for our kids!’ His mantra… “go and do it”!! And if “it” is right – then you can’t fail.”

To name only a fraction of the awards and achievements Bill received are the notable honour of a CBE in 2002, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Theatrical Management Association in 2008, and an honourary BBC Radio 2 special episode of Friday Night in 2017 broadcast from the London Palladium itself. Bill was nominated for a London Theatre Critics’ Award for West Side Story and a Tony Award for Blood Brothers.

This multi-award winning career saw Bill’s West End productions constantly in notable venues such as the RSC, Dominion, Palladium, Apollo and many others. Ensuring his legacy as one of the UK’s most successful theatre producers.

Bill embodied the spirit of empowering young people through creative opportunities. His legacy will be felt and continued through the many groups and communities he supported with the mission of providing opportunities to local young people. Bill made his community and generations of people richer through experiences such as finding like minds, getting creative and fostering confidence in young people.

The RYTC in memory of Bill will continue to “go and do it” as his legacy will continue to empower our team, kids and encourage everyone to be creative.

Our thoughts are with Bill’s family at this difficult time and also with the many people we know he impacted for the better.

Drama therapy is a powerful tool that uses the art of drama to support emotional and mental health. It has been used for many years in therapeutic settings, but it is also an effective tool for children to learn about and explore their emotions. 

Drama therapy uses a range of techniques to support children in expressing themselves, building relationships, and developing self-awareness. 

In this blog, we will explore some fun and engaging ways to introduce children to the world of drama therapy.

1. Role-Playing

Role-playing is a great way to introduce children to drama therapy. Children can act out different scenarios and characters, which can help them explore their emotions and develop their social and emotional skills. For example, children can act out scenarios where they need to express their feelings, such as a conversation with a friend or family member. They can also act out different emotions, such as anger or sadness, to help them understand and express their feelings.

2. Storytelling

Storytelling is another great way to introduce children to drama therapy. Children can create stories using drama, which can help them explore their emotions and develop their creative skills. For example, children can create stories where they overcome obstacles or challenges, which can help them build resilience and problem-solving skills.

3. Improvisation

Improvisation is a key technique in drama therapy, and it is a fun and engaging way to introduce children to the world of drama. Children can engage in improvisation activities, such as creating a story together or acting out a scenario without a script. This can help them develop their creativity, communication, and problem-solving skills.

4. Puppetry

Puppetry is a fun and interactive way to introduce children to drama therapy. Children can create their own puppets and act out scenarios, which can help them explore their emotions and develop their communication skills. For example, children can create a puppet that represents their emotions and use it to express their feelings.

5. Drama Games

Drama games are a fun and engaging way to introduce children to drama therapy. There are many drama games that can be adapted for therapeutic purposes, such as “Emotional Charades,” where children act out different emotions, or “Yes, And,” where children build on each other’s ideas. Drama games can help children develop their creativity, communication, and social skills.

6. Mindful Movement

Mindful movement is a technique that combines drama therapy with mindfulness. It involves using movement, such as yoga or dance, to help children connect with their bodies and emotions. Mindful movement can help children develop their self-awareness, self-regulation, and emotional resilience.

7. Drama-Based Learning

Drama-based learning is a technique that uses drama to support academic learning. It involves using drama activities to teach academic concepts, such as history or science. Drama-based learning can help children engage with academic content in a fun and interactive way, which can help them develop their creativity, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills.

To sum it up, introducing children to the world of drama therapy can be a fun and engaging way to support their emotional and mental health. By using techniques such as role-playing, storytelling, improvisation, puppetry, drama games, mindful movement, and drama-based learning, children can develop their social and emotional skills, build relationships, and develop self-awareness. These techniques can also be adapted for therapeutic purposes, and can be used to support children who are experiencing emotional or mental health challenges.